Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Are Mortgage Points Tax Deductible?

Posted: 21 Mar 2017 02:36 PM PDT

Are Mortgage Points Tax Deductible?

Published: August 15, 2016

When you took out a mortgage to buy your home, did you pay points? You may be able to deduct that prepaid interest on your federal tax return -- but only if you meet a long list of rules.
The points you paid when you signed a mortgage to buy your home may help cut your federal tax bill. With points, sometimes called loan origination points or discount points, you make an upfront payment to get a particular rate from the lender.

Since mortgage interest is deductible, your points may be, too.
If you itemize your deductions on Schedule A of IRS Form 1040, you may be able to deduct all your points in the year you pay them.

Some high-income taxpayers have their total itemized deductions limited, including points. You can read more about that in the instructions for Schedule A.

Lucky for you, the IRS doesn’t care whether you or the homesellers paid the points. Either way, those points are your deduction, not the sellers’.

Tip: Tax law treats home purchase mortgage points differently from refinance mortgage points. Refinance loan points get deducted over the life of your loan. So if you paid $1,000 in points for a 10-year refinance, you’re entitled to deduct $100 per year on your Schedule A.

The Fine Print for Deducting Points

The IRS rules for deducting purchase mortgage points are straightforward, but lengthy. You must meet each of these seven tests to deduct the points in the year you pay them.
1. Your mortgage must be used to buy or build your primary residence, and the loan must be secured by that residence. Your primary home is the one you live in most of the time. As long as it has cooking equipment, a toilet, and you can sleep in it, your main residence can be a house, a trailer, or a boat.
Points paid on a second home have to be deducted over the life of your loan.
2. Paying points must be a customary business practice in your area. And the amount can’t exceed the percentage normally charged. If most people in your area pay one or two points, you can’t pay 10 points and then deduct them.
3. Your points have to be legitimate. You can’t have your lender label other things on your settlement statement, like appraisal fees, inspection fees, title fees, attorney fees, service fees, or property taxes as “points” and deduct them.
4. You have to use the cash method of accounting. That’s when you report your income to the IRS as it comes in and report your expenses when you pay them. Almost everybody uses this method for tax accounting.
5. You must pay the points directly. That is, you can’t have borrowed the funds from your lender to pay them. Any points paid by the seller are treated as being paid directly by you.
In addition, monies you pay, such as a downpayment or earnest money deposit, are considered monies out of your pocket that cover the points so long as they’re equal to or more than points.  Say you put $10,000 down and pay $1,000 in points. The downpayment exceeds the points, so your points are covered and therefore you can deduct them if you itemize. If you were to put nothing down but you paid one point, that $1,000 wouldn’t be deductible.
6. Your points have to be calculated as a percentage of your mortgage. One point is 1% of your mortgage amount, so one point on a $100,000 mortgage is $1,000.
7. The points have to show up on your settlement disclosure statement as “points.” They might be listed as loan origination points or discount points.
Tip: You can also fully deduct points you pay (for the year paid) on a loan to improve your main home if you meet tests one through five above.

Where to Deduct Points

Figured out that your points are deductible? Here’s how you deduct them:
Your lender will send you a Form 1098. Look in Box 2 to find the points paid for your loan.
If you don’t get a Form 1098, look on the settlement disclosure you received at closing. The points will show up on that form in the sections detailing your costs or the sellers’ costs, depending on who paid the points.
Report your points on Schedule A of IRS Form 1040.

There are Two Things Related to Points You Can’t Deduct:

1.  Interest buy-downs your builder paid
Some builders put money in an escrow account (as a buyer incentive) that the lender taps each month to supplement your mortgage payment. Those aren’t considered points even though the money is used for an interest payment and it’s prepaid. You can’t deduct the money the builder put into that escrow account.
2.  Interest payments from government programs
You can’t deduct points paid by a federal, state, or local program, such as the federal Hardest Hit Fund, to help you if you’re experiencing financial trouble.
Related: More Homeownership Deductions You Don’t Want to Miss

source: Houselogic.com

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Four things to know about qualifying and closing a mortgage loan for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers

Kentucky First Time Home Buyers Questions Answered Below:


1.  Do Mortgage Interest Rates Change Daily?

Just like the gas prices at the pump,  mortgage rates can change daily or throughout the day.  Typically mortgage rates are published at 10-11 am daily by most lenders and you can lock up through the close of business which is usually around 6-7 PM.  Mortgage rates can change up or down throughout the day based on various financial, economics, and geopolitical news in the US Financial markets and World markets. Generally speaking, good economic news is bad for rates and vice versa, bad economic news is good for mortgage rates. 

The good news is this: Once you find a home and get it under contract, you can lock your mortgage loan rate. Typically it takes about 30-45 days to close a mortgage loan in Kentucky, so the typical lock is for 30-60 days. If rates get better you may be able to negotiate a better rate with your lender, but they usually have to improve by at least 25 basis points (.25) to do that. Not all lenders offer this option. The longer you lock the loan, the greater the costs. It is usually free to lock in a loan for up to 90 days without having to pay a fee.

What a lot of lenders are experiencing now is that some loans don't close on time for various reasons. You can always extend the lock on the loan but it will costs you usually .125 basis points to do so. If you let the lock expire on the loan, then you have to take worse case pricing on that day when you go to relock. It is usually best to extend the lock on your loan. 


2. What kind of Credit Score Do I need to qualify?

When applying for a mortgage loan, lenders will pull what they call a "tri-merge" credit report which will show three different fico scores from Transunion, Equifax, and Experian. The lenders will throw out the high and low score and take the "middle score" For example, if you had a 614, 610, and 629 score from the three main credit bureaus, your qualifying score would be 614. Most lenders will want at least two scores. So if you only have one score, you may not qualify. Lenders will have to pull their own credit report and scores so if you had it ran somewhere else or saw it on a website or credit card you may own, it will not matter to the lender, because they have to use their own credit report and scores. 
Most lenders will pull your credit report for free nowadays so this should not be a big deal as long as your scores are high enough. 
The Secondary Market of Mortgage loans offered by FHA, VA, USDA, Fannie Mae, and KHC all have their minimum fico score requirements and lenders will create overlays in addition to what the Government agencies will accept, so even if on paper FHA says they will go down to 580 or 500 in some cases on fico scores, very few lenders will go below the 620 threshold. 
If you have low fico scores it may make sense to check around with different lenders to see what their minimum fico scores are for loans. 
The lenders I currently deal with have the following fico cutoffs for credit scores:
FHA--620 minimum score
VA----620 minimum score
Fannie Mae--620 minimum score
USDA--640 minimum score
KHC with Down Payment Assistance --640 minimum score.
As you can see, 620 is the minimum score with most lenders for a FHA, VA, or Fannie Mae loan, and 640 is required for the no down payment programs offered by USDA and KHC in Kentucky for First Time Home Buyers wanting to go no money down.

3. What are the down payment requirements?


The most popular programs for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers usually involves one of the following housing programs outlined in bold below:
FHA:

FHA will allow a home buyer to purchase a house with as little as 3.5% down. If your credit scores are low, say 680 and below, a lot of times it makes sense to go FHA because everyone pays the same mortgage insurance premiums no matter what your score is, and the down payment can be gifted to you. Meaning you really don't have to have any skin into the game when it comes to down payment. They even allow down payment assistance through eligible parties (government grants or non-profits). Lastly, FHA will allow for higher debt to income ratios with sometimes getting loan pre-approvals up to 55% of your total gross monthly income. 
Fannie Mae:
Fannie Mae requires just 3% down with their new Home Possible Program, but if you use their traditional mortgage loan, then 5% is the Fannie Mae Standard. Fannie Mae will o down to a 620 score, but if your scores are below 680, I would look seriously at the FHA loan program because Fannie Mae has steep increases to the interest rate and the mortgage insurance premiums if your scores are low. 
A couple of good things about Fannie Mae is that you can buy a larger priced home and have a large loan amount due to FHA only allowing most Kentucky Home Buyers a maximum mortgage loan amount of $275-to $287k price range while Fannie Mae will go up to Conforming loan limits of $410k.
Lastly when it comes to mortgage insurance, FHA mortgage insurance premiums are for life of loan while Fannie Mae mortgage insurance premiums drop off when you develop 80% equity position in your house. 
But as a tell most people, nobody has a loan for 30 years, and the average mortgage is either refinanced or home sold within the first 5-7 years. 
VA Loans- 

VA loans offer eligible Veterans and Active Duty Personnel to buy a home going no money down with no monthly mortgage insurance. This is probably the best no money down loan out there since the rates are traditionally very low on comparison to other government insured mortgages and no monthly mortgage insurance. The VA loan can be used anywhere in the state of Kentucky with the maximum VA loan limit being $417k
USDA Loans- 

USDA loans offer people buying a home in rural areas (typically towns of $20k or less) to buy a home going zero down. You cannot currently own another home and there is household income limits of $75,000 for a household family of four, and up to $99,000 for a household of five or more. You search USDA website for eligible areas and household income limits below at the yellow highlighted link :
KHC or Kentucky Housing-
Kentucky First Time Home Buyers typically use KHC for their down payment assistance. KHC currently offers $4500 to $6000 for down payment assistance and sometimes throughout the year they will offer low mortgage rates on their mortgage revenue bond program. The down payment assistance usually never runs out because you have to pay it back in the form of a second mortgage. It helps a lot of home buyers that want to buy in urban areas that cannot utilizer the USDA program in rural areas. Most of the time the first mortgage is a FHA loan tied with the 2nd mortgage fore down payment assistance.  All KHC programs require a 640 score and rates are locked for 45 days. Max income limits are usually set around $112k for a household with the max loan being $283,000 currently. 


4. What if I have had a bankruptcy or foreclosure in the past? 



FHA and VA are the easiest on previous bankruptcies. FHA and VA both require 2 years removed from the discharge date on a Chapter 7. If you are in the middle of a Chapter 13, FHA will allow for financing with a 12 month clean history payment to the Chapter 13 courts, and with trustee permission

VA requires 2 years removed from a foreclosure (sheriff sale date of home) and FHA requires 3 years. 

USDA requires 3 years removed from both a foreclosure and bankruptcy, but on the foreclosure they do not go off the sale date. This may save you a little time if you had a previous foreclosure. 

Fannie Mae (Conventional Loan)

Fannie Mae is by far the strictest. They require 4-7  years out of a foreclosure or bankruptcy 


If you have questions about qualifying as first time home buyer in Kentucky, please call, text, email or fill out free prequalification below for your next mortgage loan pre-approval.












The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only.  The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines.  This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people

Sunday, March 12, 2017

KENTUCKY FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS MORTGAGE REQUIREMENTS

Kentucky First Time Home Buyers Programs for 2017



Rest assured, most Kentucky  first-time home buyers in 2017 are confused and lack confidence when it comes to buying their first home in Kentucky. However, in 2016 there are some great Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Programs so you can buy a home with little or nothing down at really low fixed rates.



Kentucky First Time Home Buyer Programs





I have successfully originated over 375 Kentucky first time home buyer loans, so I feel confident that I can lay the groundwork in this post of what you need to know to get pre-approved so you can start shopping for your home with confidence.

There are basically 4 mortgage programs for first time home buyers in Kentucky to consider:

1. FHA: 

Kentucky FHA loans are a popular choice in Jefferson County Kentucky first time home buyers because they allow the least down payment of 3.5%, vs Fannie Mae which now requires a 5% investment on primary residences.

The current credit score requirements center around the 620 score for most FHA loans in Kentucky, with no bankruptcies in the last 2 years and no foreclosures in the last 3 years.

Even though FHA insure a mortgage loan down to a 580 credit score or lower sometimes, it is very difficult to find a lender that will approve the loan with scores below 620. Keep that in mind.

The house payment will need to be around 30% of your gross monthly income. For example if you gross around $3000 a month, then the maximum mortgage payment you would qualify would be $1000 a month. If the loan comes back as an accept, the debt to income ratio can be substantially higher than the 31% rule.

All FHA loans are pre-approved through an AUS, an automated underwriting system upfront that will dictate your loan approval. The software underwriting engine looks at your credit, income, assets and figures your loan approval and will recommend an accept, refer/eligible, or refer/ineligible, or out of scope.

Most FHA investors will want a Accept on your underwriting findings to do a loan. It it comes back referred, then there are additional conditions or overlays that could stop your loan from being approved.

Check Kentucky FHA Rates Here----->>>>>>>>
http://mortgage-x.com/x/viewrate.asp?uid=kentuckyloan


2. VA:

Kentucky VA loans require no down payment but you must have a VA certificate of Eligibility issued by the Veterans Administration to purchase a home using your VA loan entitlement.

The current credit score that most Kentucky VA lenders want is 620. There can be no bankruptcies or foreclosures in the last two years with good reestablished credit.

The maximum debt to income ratio is 41% with a residual income of around $1000 a month after you pay all your bills. For example, if you make $4000 gross monthly, then the maximum house payment along with your other household bills would be set at $3000 a month so as you have the $1000 residual income requirement met. There are some variances on the residual income to whereas it is based on the number of people living in the household and which state you live in.


Check Kentucky VA Mortgage Rates Here------>>>>>>>


3. USDA/Rural Housing:


USDA or Rural Housing loans are not available in the more highly populated counties in Kentucky . The counties of Jefferson and Fayette Counties are not eligible for USDA loans.

USDA loans require no down payment and are subject to income and property eligibility requirements by County..


Check Kentucky USDA  Income Limits Here"----->>>>

Check Kentucky USDA Property Eligibility Limits Here--->>>>


All Kentucky Rural Housing Loans are ran through GUS, Guarantee Underwriting System, an online to determine your loan approval

The Automated Underwriting engine will come back with an Accept, Refer, or Ineligible.

Most USDA mortgage investor want an Accept on the initial underwriting approval to do the loan.

640 is the score that most USDA lenders want, but USDA will go down to a 580 credit score in their guidelines but it is very difficult to get approved.

If you have a score below 640 and trying to go USDA, work on getting your credit scores up first.

4. Kentucky Housing Corp or KHC 

KHC is used for mostly applicants in urban areas of Kentucky that don't have access to USDA or other government agencies to buy a home with no down payment.
Down Payment Assistance for Ky First Time Home Buyer, 100% Financing


Down Payment:  There are still housing programs that exist for Kentucky home buyers whereas you can purchase a home with no down payment. You will need a 640 mid credit score to purchase a home using the KHC loan programs for their no down payment credit requirements.

How the Down Payment Assistance Program (DAP) Works

A minimum of 3.5% down payment is required with this loan. Down payment assistance loans are available from $4500-$6,000, and are paid back over a period of ten years. They are typically offered to buyers with limited cash reserves and carry an interest rate of 1 to 5.5%. These loans can make a critical difference to buyers for whom the down payment is an obstacle. Buyers whose 3.5% down payment is less than the $6000 limit may choose to use the remainder of a down payment loan to pay closing costs, further reducing the amount needed to bring to closing.

Regular DAP

·     
·         Assistance in the form of a loan up to $6,000 in $100 increments.
·         Repayable over a ten-year term at 5.50 percent.  A DAP of $6,000 over ten years at 5.50 percent interest would equal a payment of $65.12.
·         Available to a KHC first-mortgage loan recipients


  • First-time and repeat homebuyers statewide
  • 30-year fixed interest rate
  • Principal residence ONLY
  • Purchase Price Limit:  $294,000
  • Borrower must meet KHC's Secondary Market Income Limits

Affordable DAP

·         Purchase price up to $243,000.
·         Assistance up to $4,500.
·         Repayable over a ten-year term at 1.00 percent.
·         Borrowers must meet Affordable DAP household income limits.





•Households whose gross annual income does not exceed $40,000.
•An existing or new construction property (purchase price limit $130,000) in a county not receiving HHF DAP funds*.
•640 minimum credit score.
•FHA, VA, or RHS first mortgage options.
•Households who meet one of the following criteria:
◦At least one of the home buyers is age 62 or older.
◦At least one member of the household is disabled and receiving disability income.
◦A single-or two parent household with at least one dependent child under the age of 18 living in the household.

-- 
Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
text or call 502-905-3708 cell
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.mylouisvillekentuckymortgage.com/


This web site is not the FHA, VA, USDA, HUD or any other government organization responsible for managing, insuring, regulating or issuing residential mortgage loans.
All approvals and rates are not guaranteed, and are only issued based on standard mortgage qualifying guidelines


Remember, we are even available this weekend for pre-qualifications or questions.  Call our cell phone or email us.  If you miss us, leave a message and we WILL call you back

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Bankruptcy Guidelines for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers in 2017 for FHA, VA, USDA, and Fannie Mae Mortgage Loans


No automatic alt text available.



You can obtain a copy of your bankruptcy paperwork from the website below:

Bankruptcy Courts    http://www.pacer.psc.uscourts.gov/ 
:
Conventional Loan Bankrupcty Guidelines for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

A four-year waiting period is required, measured from the discharge or dismissal date of the bankruptcy action until the application date.

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

two years from the discharge date to the application date, or
four years from the dismissal date to the application date.

The shorter waiting period based on the discharge date recognizes that borrowers have already met a portion of the waiting period within the time needed for the successful completion of a Chapter 13 plan and subsequent discharge.

A borrower who was unable to complete the Chapter 13 plan and received a dismissal will be held to a four-year waiting period.

Exceptions for Extenuating Circumstances

A two-year waiting period is permitted after a Chapter 13 dismissal, if extenuating circumstances can be documented. There are no exceptions permitted to the two-year waiting period after a Chapter 13 discharge.

Foreclosure / Short Sale


A seven-year waiting period is required. In all instances, the “date of foreclosure” is considered the date of the foreclosure deed. The end date of the waiting period is the application date.

Foreclosure / Short Sale – Extenuating Circumstance A three-year waiting period is permitted if extenuating circumstances can be documented. Additional requirements apply between three and seven years, which include:

FHA Loan Guidelines for  Bankruptcy and Foreclosure for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers

Chapter 7

Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharged more than 24 months prior to the application date may be allowed.
Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharged between 12 and 24 months prior to the application date requires satisfactorily established credit and documentation showing the circumstances which caused the bankruptcy were beyond the borrower's control (i.e. unemployment, medical bills not covered by insurance). In these instances, the file must be manually downgraded to a refer and manually underwritten. It falls upon the underwriter to make a final determination as to the overall quality of the file.
Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharged less than 12 months prior to the application date is not allowed.

Chapter 13


Loans where the borrower is currently in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy or had a Chapter 13 bankruptcy which was discharged within the previous 2 years require manual downgrade and must be underwritten manually. Note that manual underwrites require Underwriting Management approval.

A borrower who is currently in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be eligible for FHA financing provided all of the following conditions are met in addition to standard manual underwriting requirements:


Foreclosure / Short Sale

A foreclosure less than 3 years ago is not allowed.
In all instances, the “date of foreclosure” is considered the date of the foreclosure deed. The end date of the timeframe is determined by the application date.





Kentucky VA Loan Guidelines for Bankruptcy and Foreclosure for Kentucky Home Buyers



Chapter 7

Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharged more than 24 months prior to application date may be disregarded.
Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharged between 12 and 24 months prior to application date requires satisfactorily established credit and documentation showing the circumstances which caused the bankruptcy were beyond the borrower's control (i.e. unemployment, medical bills not covered by insurance). In these instances, the file must be manually downgraded to a refer and manually underwritten. It falls upon the underwriter to make a final determination as to the overall quality of the file.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharged less than 12 months prior to application date is not allowed.
Note that for High Balance Transactions a minimum of 7 years must have elapsed since the discharge date regardless of AUS findings.

Chapter 13

The borrower’s credit history since the bankruptcy, the circumstances behind the bankruptcy, and the discharge date all factor in to the final determination by the underwriter.
A borrower who is currently in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be eligible for VA financing


Foreclosure / Short Sale

Foreclosure more than 36 months prior to application date may be disregarded.
Foreclosure less than 36 months prior to application date is not allowed.
Note that for High Balance Transactions a minimum of 7 years must have elapsed since the forelcosure date regardless of AUS findings.
In all instances, the “date of foreclosure” is considered the date of the foreclosure deed.





USDA Guidelines for Bankruptcy and Foreclosure for Kentucky Home Buyers

Chapter 7

The Discharge date and GUS findings both play an important role in determining the viability and future repayment of the new loan. As such, Chapter 7 bankruptcy seasoning is evaluated by GUS.


Chapter 13

Loans where the borrower is currently in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy or had a Chapter 13 bankruptcy which was discharged within the previous 3 years require a manual downgrade and must be underwritten manually.

A borrower who is currently in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be eligible for RD financing provided all of the following conditions are met in addition to standard manual underwriting requirements:
• At least 12 months of payments have been made satisfactorily
• The Trustee or bankruptcy judge’s approval to enter into the mortgage transaction is documented
• Bankruptcy payments are included in the borrower’s debt ratio


Foreclosure / Short Sale

The foreclosure date and GUS findings both play an important role in determining the viability and future repayment of the new loan. As such, foreclosure seasoning is evaluated by GUS.

A foreclosure does not automatically disqualify a borrower from RD financing. In all instances, the “date of foreclosure” is considered the date of the foreclosure deed.
















Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer

American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 MB73346


Text/call 502-905-3708

 kentuckyloan@gmail.com



Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant's eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916 
http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/

-- Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.